Undergraduate Program

Features of Program

AMST@IUPUI offers an undergraduate minor and a certificate in Social Justice Organizing that reflects the curriculum of the Masarachia Scholars Program. To learn more about either the certificate or the Masarachia Program please contact Thomas Marvin, Associate Professor of English and Director of Masarachia Scholars Program

AMST-A101: Introduction to American Studies fulfills one course in the category of Cultural Understanding of IUPUI's General Education Requirements. AMST 101 is taught both on campus and on-line every semester.

The American Studies program also provides direct course credit for study abroad in two universities in England: the University of Derby and Newcastle University. Please see below for more information.

Requirements for minor

AMST-A 101: Introduction to American Studies

AMST-A 301: The Question of American Identity

AMST-A 302: The Question of American Community

AMST-A 303: Topics in American Studies 

SIX (6) additional hours at the 300 or 400 level, including AMST cross-listed courses with any other department and international courses

Examples of undergraduate AMST courses

 AMST-A102: Asian-American Culture, 3crs., on campus (NEW COURSE for Spring 2018)

This course seeks to foster an understanding of issues related to race in general and to Asians Americans in particular. Contributing to this understanding will be discussions of Asian American history, stereotypes, racism and oppression, refugees, racial identity development, and diversity within the Asian communities of the U.S. Discussions of the varied, lived experiences of Asians in the U.S. will be utilized to gain insights into how Asian Americans fit into the racial narrative of American culture.

AMST-A302: The Question of American Community, 3crs., on campus

What are the varieties and forms of American social life? This course will explore the manner in which Americans, from the Puritans through the later decades of the 20th Century, have structured and experienced social life in rural, urban and suburban settings.

AMST-A341: Organizing for Social Action, 3crs, on campus

In this course we will study the social movements of the past and meet the activists who are working for social justice today. We will learn about the history of American protest from pre-Revolutionary days to the present in order to understand how mass organizations are created and how they can be used to realize the American ideals of liberty, equality, justice, peace, and opportunity for all. Emphasis throughout is on bridging the academic perspective of the classroom with the practical concerns of different communities. This will be a "traveling seminar," moving between the classroom and the world outside. Our class may meet at the site of a labor, senior, or other community organization, hosted by a representative of that organization. Other weeks, the organizers will come to us. Students have the option of participating in a service-learning project and reflecting on the connections between assigned readings and the practice of organizing. Our central question will be: what can the social-action organizations of the past and present teach us about the possibilities for progressive social change in our world today?

AMST-A356: American Supernatural, 3crs., on-line

Belief in the supernatural has been an important component of American culture since the founding of the country. From the Salem Witch Trials to The Amityville Horror and from the stories of Edgar Allen Poe to the television series Lost, there seems to be no limit to Americans appetite for myths and legends that deal with the fantastic, otherworldly or otherwise unbelievable. This course will examine several aspects of this cultural fascination with the supernatural, from the mystery of "Area 51" to the legends of the delta blues singers. Along the way, we'll examine larger questions, such as: Why is belief in the supernatural of continuing relevance to American culture? How does the popular and new media (especially the Internet) perpetuate this belief, and is there a danger in doing so? To what extent are the American character and its definition of self-identity shaped by the belief in the supernatural?

AMST-A497 Overseas Study, Derby, UK, 1-6 crs.

Students may take a wide range of courses (modules) offered at the University of Derby

In order to see if this program is academically a good fit, students need to research the University of Derby website and review the different modules offered.  Students are only allowed to select from modules offered in the "Joint Honours Degrees".

  • To search for modules:

     

    1. Go to the “Course Search” site and select the “Subject area search” tab.
    2. Select the subject area you’re interested in, check the "Joint Honours" box for the Course level/type, then hit the "Search" button.
    3. From the search results, select the course(s) you’re interested in learning about.
    4. On the page that appears, click on the section titled “What you will cover” to see the list of modules offered in the course. Students are only allowed to take modules offered in "Stage 2" and "Stage 3"

Students will maintain full-time status (minimum of 12 credit hours, but 15 credit hours recommended) at IUPUI during their semester at the University of Derby.  Most of the modules offered at Derby are worth 20 credits, which is equivalent to 5 IU credits.  Typically, students enroll in 3 modules during their semester at Derby.

Students need to work with their academic advisor when reviewing the module options to identify modules that will further them in their IUPUI degree.  Students should identify backup modules, too, in case the first choice modules are not available during their semester abroad.

The available coursework is particularly suited for, but not necessarily limited to, the following academic interests: American Studies, Anthropology, English, Geography, History, Political Science, Sociology, and Western European Languages and Cultures.

Additional Information

For more information about the exchange, please contact Martin Coleman – martcole@iupui.edu

To learn more about the University of Derby, please go here.

Go here to learn more about the city of Derby and the surrounding area.

AMST-B497 Oversears Study, Newcastle, UK, 1-6 crs.

Students may take a wide range of courses (modules) offered in the following academic schools: Architecture, Planning & Landscape; Arts & Cultures; Education, Communication & Language Sci; English Lit, Language & Linguistics; Geography, Politics & Sociology; Historical Studies; Modern Languages.

Students are not allowed to enroll in modules in academic schools other than the schools listed above.  Students are also not allowed to enroll in Psychology modules.

Students are restricted to Stage 2 (equivalent to Jr. year) and Stage 3 (equivalent to Sr. year) level modules. Students will maintain full-time status (minimum of 12 credit hours) at IUPUI during their semester at Newcastle University.  Most of the modules offered at Newcastle are worth 10 ECTS credits, which is equivalent to 5 IU credits.  Typically, students enroll in 3 modules during their semester at Newcastle.

Students should work with their academic advisor when reviewing the module options to identify modules that will further them in their IUPUI degree.  Students should identify backup modules, too, in case the first choice modules are not available during their semester abroad.

To learn more about these academic schools, please visit the schools' websites: School of Architecture, Planning & Landscape; School of Arts and Cultures; School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences; School of English Literature, Language & Linguistics; School of Geography, Politics and Sociology; School of History, Classics and Archaeology; School of Modern Languages; Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

The available coursework is particularly suited for, but not necessarily limited to, the following academic interests: Anthropology, Classics, Comparative Literature, English, Geography, History, Museum Studies, Political Science, Sociology, and Western European Languages and Cultures.

Additional Information

For more information about Newcastle University, visit: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/international

To contact the program director, Professor Jason Kelly, please email: jaskelly@iupui.edu